Menu

Be Plant Wise

Be Plant Wise

Be Plant Wise - gardeners are being asked to keep their ponds under control, ensure invasive plants don't escape to the wild and to dispose of unwanted plants carefully.

E News

image

Grey Squirrel. Copyright Lorne Gill/SNH

Useful Links

Check Clean Dry

logo

If you are a water user, you may be unknowingly helping to spread invasive species from place to place on your equipment, shoes and clothing. By following 3 simple biosecurity (good hygiene) practices you can help protect the water sports you love.

Simply 'Check, Clean, Dry' all equipment and clothing when leaving the water.

Non-native Species

Non-native species are those that have been introduced - deliberately or accidentally - by humans.

There are many non-native species in Scotland, although only a small number of these cause damage to the environment, the economy, our health and the way we live. These are called invasive non-native species.

The Scottish Government is working with a range of partners across Great Britain to minimise the risk posed, and the negative impacts caused, by invasive non-native species in Scotland.

What's new

Black bee reserve created.

Between 5 February and 19 April 2013 the Scottish Government sought views on the creation of a protected area for Apis mellifera mellifera encompassing Colonsay and Oronsay using the powers contained in the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. Responses and the Scottish Government report are available.

The Scottish Government concluded that a protected area should be created and The Bee Keeping (Colonsay and Oronsay) Order 2013 was laid before Parliament on 26 September 2013. It comes into force on 1 January 2014.

New legislation comes into force in Scotland on 2 July 2012.

The Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2011 (Commencement No. 4, Savings and Transitional Provisions) Order 2012 was laid before the Scottish Parliament on 31 May 2012. This is the final commencement Order for the Act and principally deals with its non-native species provisions.

Two further Orders, dealing with non-native species were also laid on 31 May 2012:

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Keeping and Release and Notification Requirements) (Scotland) Order 2012 maintains the restrictions that were previously in place on the keeping and release of certain invasive animals and the requirement to report the presence of certain invasive animals. The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Keeping and Release and Notification Requirements) (Scotland) Amendment Order 2012 makes some changes to the terms used in describing the species listed.

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Exceptions to section 14) (Scotland) Order 2012 creates exceptions to the new non-native species offences where they are required – it does so in relation to the planting of certain species of plants and catch and release by anglers. The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (Exceptions to section 14) (Scotland) Order 2012 makes some changes to the terms used in describing the species listed and clarifies a reference in the original Order.

The first Code of Practice on Non-Native Species was approved by Parliament on 28 June 2012.