Poverty and Income Inequality Scotland: 2011-12

Listen

Key points

  • In 2011/12, there were 710 thousand individuals living in relative poverty in Scotland compared to 780 thousand in 2010/11, a drop of 70 thousand individuals. The number of individuals living in poverty fell from 15 per cent to 14 per cent between 2010/11 and 2011/12, although this is not a statistically significant change. This follows a decrease in the number of individuals in relative poverty in 2010/11, with a 6 year period of little change in poverty levels prior to that.
  • The percentage of children living in relative poverty fell from 17 per cent to 15 per cent between 2010/11 and 2011/12, which represents a reduction of 20 thousand children from 170 thousand children to 150 thousand children. This change is not statistically significant. This follows a decrease in the number of children living in relative poverty in 2010/11, with little change in the 6 year period prior to that.
  • In 2011/12, there were 420 thousand working age adults living in relative poverty in Scotland compared with 440 thousand in 2010/11. This is a decrease from 14 per cent to 13 per cent between 2010/11 and 2011/12, although this is not a statistically significant change. This represents a reduction of 20 thousand working age adults, and follows a decrease in the number of working age adults in relative poverty in 2010/11, following a small increase in the number of working age adults living in relative poverty between 2006/07 and 2009/10.
  • 140 thousand pensioners were living in relative poverty in 2011/12, a decrease of 20 thousand pensioners since 2010/11. This is a reduction from 16 per cent to 15 per cent between 2010/11 and 2011/12. This change is not statistically significant. The percentage of pensioners living in relative poverty has remained largely unchanged since 2008/09, following a decrease in 2007/08.
  • In terms of income inequality, the percentage of income received by the lowest 3 income deciles in 2011/12 was 14 per cent, unchanged from 2010/11. This percentage has remained at between 13 and 14 per cent since 1998/99.
  • The equivalised median income in Scotland in 2011/12 was £436 per week, net income. This compares to £437 in 2010/11. The equivalised median income in Scotland generally recorded annual increases in value up to 2009/10 (£461 per week) before decreasing in 2010/11.
  • No statistically significant changes were observed between 2010/11 and 2011/12 to the absolute poverty levels.

Please Note:

The figures above are based on income 'before housing costs' (BHC); changes in income 'after housing costs' (AHC) are given later in the publication.

All figures in this publication are rounded to the nearest 10 thousand individuals or whole percentage point. In some cases calculations based on the unrounded figures do not match those based on the rounded ones.