Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2010: Attitudes to Discrimination and Positive Action

DescriptionThis report explores attitudes to discrimination and positive action in Scotland in relation to: age, disability, gender, race, religion or belief, gender reassignment and sexual orientation.
ISBN978 1 780453255
Official Print Publication DateAugust 2011
Website Publication DateAugust 11, 2011

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ISBN 978 1 78045 325 5 (Web only publication)
DPPAS 11901

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Table of Contents

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1 BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION
Defining 'discriminatory attitudes' and 'positive action'
Why do attitudes to discrimination and positive action matter?
Previous research
The 2010 survey: context and aims
Methodological challenges in measuring attitudes to discrimination and positive action
About the data
Report structure and conventions

2 GENERAL ATTITUDES TO PREJUDICE
Introduction
Is prejudice ever acceptable?
How do attitudes to prejudice vary?
Sociological factors
Economic factors
Psychological factors
Contact with different groups of people
Summary

3 RELATIONSHIPS
Introduction
Personal relationships
How do attitudes to relationships vary?
Gender, age and education
General attitudes to prejudice and diversity
Knowing someone from a particular group
Religion
Attitudes to same sex relationships
Summary

4 EMPLOYMENT
Introduction
Equity and participation in the labour market
How do attitudes vary?
Different contexts, different attitudes?
Gender and employment rights
How do attitudes to maternity and paternity leave vary?
Age and employment
Perceived labour market competition
Summary

5 RELIGIOUS DRESS AND SYMBOLS
Introduction
Different symbols, different attitudes?
How do views of religious symbols vary?
Demographic differences
Attitudes to prejudice and diversity
Attitudes towards and contact with Muslims
Summary

6 PROMOTING EQUALITY AND POSITIVE ACTION
Introduction
Equal opportunities
Accessibility of services and information
Targeted funding for employment support
Positive action by companies
Summary

7 ARE ATTITUDES CHANGING?
Introduction
Trends between 2002 and 2006
Why might attitudes have changed between 2006 and 2010?
What changes have occurred since 2006?
Gay men and Lesbians
Transsexual people
Older People
Religious groups
Ethnic Minority groups
Other Groups
Summary

8 HAS THE RECESSION HAD AN IMPACT?
Labour market issues
Accessibility of Shops and Banks
Summary

9 CONCLUSIONS
The extent and nature of discriminatory attitudes in Scotland in 2010
Attitudes towards positive action
Changing attitudes

REFERENCES

ANNEX A - ADDITIONAL TABLES
Notes on tables
Chapter 2 additional tables
Chapter 3 additional tables
Chapter 4 additional tables
Chapter 6 additional tables

ANNEX B -TECHNICAL DETAILS OF THE SURVEY
The Scottish Social Attitudes series
The 2010 survey
Sample design
Response rates
Sample size for previous years
Weighting
Fieldwork
Fieldwork procedures and equality
Analysis variables
National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification ( NS-SEC)
Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD)
Analysis techniques
Regression models
Chapter 2 regression models
Chapter 4 regression models
Chapter 5 regression models
Chapter 6 regression models
References in technical annex

ANNEX C - FULL QUESTION TEXT AND RESPONSES

List of tables and figures

Figure 1.1 Timeline of key legislative changes and media and other events.

Table 2.1 Attitudes to prejudice by education, age and gender (row %)
Table 2.2 Attitudes to prejudice by socio-economic class and economic activity (row %)
Table 2.3 Responses to questions about immigration and Scotland's identity (2010, row %)
Table 2.4 Attitudes to prejudice by comfort with diversity, beliefs about the impact of immigration on Scotland's identity, and whether religious or not (row %)
Table 2.5 Contact with different groups of people (column %)
Table 2.6 Attitudes to prejudice by whether or not know anyone from different groups (row %)

Table 3.1 Feelings about different groups marrying/forming long-term relationship with a family member (row %)
Table 3.2 Unhappy with different groups forming long-term relationship with a close relative, by age (cell %)
Table 3.3 Unhappy with different groups forming long-term relationship with a close relative, by highest educational qualification (cell %)
Table 3.4 Unhappy with different groups forming long-term relationship with a close relative, by general attitudes to prejudice (cell %)
Table 3.5 Unhappy with different groups forming long-term relationship with a close relative, by whether know someone from that group (cell %)

Table 4.1 Views of the suitability of different people to be a primary school teacher (row %)
Figure 4.1 Discriminatory views in different contexts.
Figure 4.2 Views on mothers' and fathers' rights to 6 months paid leave after having a child.
Table 4.2 Beliefs about paternity leave, by gender and age (cell %)
Table 4.3 Beliefs about paternity leave, by class, self-rated hardship and household type (cell %)
Figure 4.3 Beliefs about whether people from ethnic minorities and people from Eastern Europe take jobs away from other people in Scotland.
Figure 4.4 Beliefs about black and Asian people and ethnic minority groups.

Table 5.1 Should a bank be able to insist employees remove religious dress or symbols? (column %)
Table 5.2 Attitudes to religious dress and symbols by demographic factors (cell %)
Table 5.3 Attitudes to religious dress and symbols by attitudes to prejudice and diversity (cell %)
Table 5.4 Attitudes to religious dress and symbols by contact with Muslims and attitudes to impact of Muslim immigration on Scottish identity (cell %)

Figure 6.1 Attitudes to attempts to promote equal opportunities.
Table 6.1 Agree/disagree 'Shops and banks should be forced to make themselves easier for disabled people to use, even if this leads to higher prices' (column %)
Figure 6.2 Attitudes to providing information about public services in alternative formats.
Table 6.2 Attitudes to using government money to provide information about public services in other languages for people who do not understand English well, by various factors (row %)
Table 6.3 Views on giving money to organisations that help particular groups find work (row %)
Figure 6.3 Discriminatory attitudes and attitudes to positive action targeting different groups (%)
Table 6.4 Bad/very bad use of government money to give money to organisations that help different groups find work, by gender, age and education (cell %)
Table 6.5 Bad/very bad use of government money to give money to organisations that help different groups find work, by current economic activity (cell %)
Table 6.6 Bad/very bad use of government money to give money to organisations that help different groups find work, by general attitudes to prejudice and diversity (cell %)
Figure 6.4 Perceptions of fairness of different kinds of positive action by companies (%)
Table 6.7 View positive action as unfair, by gender, age and education (cell %)
Table 6.8 View positive action as unfair, by socio-economic class and current economic activity (cell %)

Table 7.1 Acquaintance with people from different groups, 2002-10.
Table 7.2 Trends in attitudes towards same sex relationships, 2000-10.
Table 7.3 Trends in attitudes towards same sex relationships by gender, religious attendance and age group, 2005-10.
Table 7.4 Trends in attitudes towards gay men and lesbians, 2002-10.
Table 7.5 Attitudes towards same sex marriages and gay men and lesbians as primary school teachers by whether know a gay man or lesbian, 2006 and 2010.

Table 8.1 Trends in attitudes towards labour market issues, 2002-10.
Table 8.2 Trends in attitudes towards labour market issues by income, 2006-10.

Table A.2.1 Agree that if more people from particular groups moved here, Scotland would start to lose its identity, by gender, age, education, class, economic activity and area deprivation (2010, cell %)
Table A.2.2 Disagree that people from outside Britain who come to live in Scotland make it a better place, by gender, age, education, class, economic activity and area deprivation (2010, cell %)
Table A.3.1 Unhappy with different groups forming long-term relationship with a close relative, by income (cell %)
Table A.3.2 Unhappy with different groups forming long-term relationship with a close relative, by preferences for type of area live in (cell %)
Table A.3.3 Unhappy with different groups forming long-term relationship with a close relative, by religious affiliation (cell %)
Table A.4.1 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by gender (cell %)
Table A.4.2 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by age (cell %)
Table A.4.3 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by education (cell %)
Table A.4.4 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by income (cell %)
Table A.4.5 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by current religion (cell %)
Table A.4.6 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by general attitudes to prejudice (cell %)
Table A.4.7 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by preference for type of area live in (cell %)
Table A.4.8 Believe person unsuitable to be a primary school teacher, by whether knows someone from that group (cell %)
Table A.4.9 Views on compulsory retirement age, by age (column %)
Table A.4.10 Views on compulsory retirement age, by education (column %)
Table A.4.11 Agree people from ethnic minorities/people from Eastern Europe take jobs away from other people in Scotland by gender, age, education, class, economic activity and area deprivation (2010, cell %)
Table A.6.1 Attempts to give equal opportunities to different groups gone too far, by demographic and economic factors, 2010(cell %)

Table 1: 2010 Scottish Social Attitudes survey response.
Table 2: Scottish Social Attitudes survey sample size by year