Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2009: Sustainable Places and Greenspace

DescriptionA report based on data from the 2009 Scottish Social Attitudes survey which enhances the evidence base on the Sustainable Places national outcome and the links between the environment and wellbeing.
ISBN978 07559 94465
Official Print Publication DateJuly 2010
Website Publication DateJuly 01, 2010

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Susan Reid and John Curtice
Scottish Centre for Social Research (ScotCen)

ISBN 978 0 7559 9446 5 (Web only publication)
ISSN 0950 2254
DPPAS 10300

This document is also available in pdf format (918k)
This report is accompanied by a Research Findings.

CONTENTS

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND
Introduction
Context
Existing evidence on sustainable places and the role of greenspace
Survey details and questionnaire development
Structure of the report

2 WHAT DO PEOPLE THINK ABOUT THEIR LOCAL AREA?
What makes somewhere a good place to live?
Age, gender, and disability
Household income, type of accommodation, tenure and children in household
Urban rural classification and area deprivation
What is in most need of improvement in the local area?
Do priorities for improvement vary across groups in society?
Feelings about different aspects of the local area
Active Travel
Anti-social behaviour
Factors relating to satisfaction with the local area
Individual and household factors associated with satisfaction levels
Local area factors, social trust and what is most in need of improvement in the local area
Children's play areas
Power to improve the local area
Factors associated with feelings of disempowerment
Disempowerment and aspects most in need of improvement locally
Key points

3 WHAT DO PEOPLE THINK ABOUT LOCAL GREENSPACE?
What makes a good public park or local greenspace?
Gender, age and disability
Household income, type of accommodation, tenure and children in household
Urban rural classification and area deprivation
Distance to local greenspace
Factors associated with distance to local greenspace
Frequency of use of local greenspace
Main reason for use of local greenspace
What would encourage more use of local greenspace?
What would encourage different groups to use their local greenspace more often?
Satisfaction with local greenspace
Factors associated with satisfaction with local greenspace
Key points

4 DOES GREENSPACE IMPACT ON QUALITY OF LIFE?
Introduction
Analysis strategy
Self-reported health
Summary of direction of relationships
Life Satisfaction
Summary of direction of relationships
Social Trust
Summary of direction of relationships:
Community Cohesion
Summary of direction of relationships:
Key points

5 CONCLUSIONS
What makes somewhere a good place to live?
Access to and use of greenspace
Greenspace and quality of life
Potential areas for further exploration

REFERENCES

ANNEX A -TECHNICAL ANNEX
The Scottish Social Attitudes series
The 2009 survey
Sample design
Response rates
Weighting
Fieldwork
Analysis variables
National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification ( NS- SEC)
Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation ( SIMD)
References in technical annex

ANNEX B - QUESTIONNAIRE

ANNEX C - ADDITIONAL DATA TABLES

List of Tables and Figures

Table 2.1 Perceptions of what makes somewhere a good place to live (first choice, and first and second choices combined)
Table 2.2 Perceptions of what makes an area a good place to live (first and second choice combined), by age, gender and having a long-term illness or disability
Table 2.3 Perceptions of what makes an area a good place to live (first and second choice combined), by household income, accommodation type and having children in household
Table 2.4 Perceptions of what makes an area a good place to live (first and second choice combined), by Scottish Government urban rural classification, and area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table 2.5 Perceptions of what is in most need of improvement in the local area (first choice, and first and second choices combined)
Table 2.6 Perceptions of what is in most need of improvement in local area (first and second choice combined), by age, household income, urban rural classification and area deprivation quintile
Figure 2.1 Feelings about availability of somewhere green and pleasant to walk/sit and safe and pleasant places for children to play
Figure 2.2 Feelings about how easy it is to get around your area on foot
Figure 2.3 Agreement that this is a nice area to walk around in
Figure 2.4 How good or bad an area is this for cycling?
Figure 2.5 Amount of anti-social behaviour seen/heard in last 12 months
Figure 2.6 Level of satisfaction with the local area as a place to live
Table 2.7 Satisfaction with the local area by household income and area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table 2.8 Satisfaction with the local area by availability of somewhere green and pleasant to walk/sit, agreement that this is a nice area to walk around in, amount of vandalism and graffiti seen, amount of noise heard from neighbours/loud parties and social trust
Figure 2.7 Level of satisfaction with the local area by agree/disagree 'It is just too difficult for someone like me to do much about improving my local area"
Table 2.9 Agreement with whether 'it is just too difficult for someone like me to do much about improving my local area' by age, education, tenure, area deprivation ( SIMD) and social trust

Table 3.1 Perceptions of what makes somewhere a good public park or local greenspace (first choice, and first and second choices combined)
Table 3.2 Perceptions of what makes a good public park or local greenspace (first and second choice combined), by age, gender and having a long-term illness or disability
Table 3.3 Perceptions of what makes a good park or local greenspace (first and second choice combined), by household income, tenure, type of accommodation and having children in household
Table 3.4 Perceptions of what makes a good park or local greenspace (first and second choice combined), by Scottish Government urban rural classification, and area deprivation ( SIMD)
Figure 3.1 Distance from home to nearest green or open space
Table 3.5 Distance from home to nearest green or open space by education, household income, Scottish Government urban rural classification, area deprivation ( SIMD), tenure and accommodation type
Figure 3.2 Frequency of use of local greenspace
Figure 3.3 Frequency of use by distance from local greenspace
Table 3.6 Frequency of use of local greenspace by age, education, tenure, type of accommodation, household income, urban/rural and area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table 3.7 Main reason for using local greenspace
Table 3.8 Main reason for using local greenspace by age, whether children in the household (0 to 15), tenure, type of accommodation, urban/rural and area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table 3.9 What would encourage people to use local greenspace more often?
Table 3.10 What would encourage use of local greenspace more often by age, gender, education and having a long-term illness or disability
Table 3.11 What would encourage use of local greenspace more often by household income, tenure, type of accommodation and having children in household
Table 3.12 What would encourage use of local greenspace more often by Scottish Government urban rural classification, and area deprivation ( SIMD)
Figure 3.4 Satisfaction with local greenspace
Figure 3.5 Satisfaction with local greenspace by type of greenspace
Table 3.13 Satisfaction with local greenspace by age, education, tenure, type of accommodation, urban/rural and area deprivation ( SIMD)

Table 4.1 Summary of models of independently significant factors related to self-reported health
Table 4.2 Self-reported health by satisfaction with local greenspace, availability of somewhere green and pleasant to walk/sit, main reason for visiting local greenspace and satisfaction with area
Table 4.3 Summary of models of independently significant factors related to life satisfaction
Table 4.4 Life satisfaction by satisfaction with local greenspace, main reason for visiting local greenspace and satisfaction with area
Table 4.5 Summary of models of independently significant factors related to social trust
Table 4.6 Social trust by satisfaction with local greenspace, availability of safe and pleasant places for children to play, agreement that this is a nice area to walk around in, main reason for visiting local greenspace and satisfaction with area
Table 4.7 Summary of models of independently significant factors related to community cohesion
Table 4.8 Social connectedness by satisfaction with local greenspace, availability of safe and pleasant places for children to play, agreement that this is a nice area to walk around in, main reason for visiting local greenspace, frequency of use of local greenspace, type of local greenspace and satisfaction with area

Table C.1 Household income by accommodation type
Table C.2 Age by accommodation type
Table C.3 Employment status by area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table C.4 What makes somewhere a good place to live by area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table C.5 What is most in need of improvement by area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table C.6 Availability of somewhere green and pleasant to walk or sit; availability of safe and pleasant places for children to play; how easy it is to get around your area on foot
Table C.7 Area deprivation ( SIMD) by education
Table C.8 Area deprivation ( SIMD) by housing tenure
Table C.9 What makes a good park or local greenspace by area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table C.10 Area deprivation ( SIMD) by income
Table C.11 Urban/rural by area deprivation ( SIMD)
Table C.12 Frequency of visiting local greenspace by distance from nearest greenspace
Table C.13 Employment status by income
Table C.14 Employment status by housing tenure

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Government Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.