Professional Standards for Lecturers in Scotland's Colleges: June 2006

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Professional Standards for Initial Teacher Training/Education

Initial Professional Standards for Guidance and Support

Context and Rationale

Lecturers play a key role in enabling people from all sections of the community to be included in education and achieve their potential as learners. They create supportive environments by working collaboratively with teams of specialists in colleges, schools and other external agencies. Lecturers are required to understand their roles in relation to pre-programme, ongoing and progression support and guidance. These roles include recognising the learning support needs of students, referring them to specialist services and providing them with ongoing guidance and support.

Standards

The lecturer should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the principles, nature, purposes and stages of guidance and support.
2. Define the lecturer's guidance and support roles, responsibilities and boundaries and how they relate to the remits of guidance tutors and other specialists.
3. Promote and facilitate equality of opportunity and access to learning by providing effective guidance and support.
4. Implement the college's policies and procedures for guidance and support.
5. Identify learners' needs and provide appropriate guidance and support, referring to specialists where appropriate.
6. Obtain and use feedback from learners to evaluate and develop own practice in guidance and support.

Indicative Content

  • Confidentiality, impartiality, key information, informed choices, learner-centred approaches.
  • Individual and group approaches: formal and informal.
  • The lecturer's role in relation to pre-programme, induction, ongoing and progression support and guidance.
  • The importance and implications of the learner's prior knowledge, experience and motivation.
  • Initial assessment techniques, including screening and the use of diagnostic/induction tools and assistive technologies.
  • Strategies for anticipating, identifying and responding appropriately to the diverse needs of learners.
  • Electronic information and advice sources available to learners.
  • Concepts of access, inclusion, retention and progression.
  • Individual/personal learning and support plans.
  • Learner support, learning support, extended learning support and counselling.
  • Curriculum and pastoral guidance.
  • Legal and ethical considerations.
  • Socio-economic circumstances.
  • Aspects of social and cultural diversity, e.g. faiths, gender, race, disability and age including young learners.
  • Policies and procedures of partner schools.
  • Potential progression and articulation routes, including employment, other college programmes and courses delivered by HEIs.
  • Methods of obtaining learner and stakeholder feedback.

Initial Professional Standards for Planning and Preparing the Learning Experience

Context and Rationale

The lecturer normally works as a member of a team contributing to the design, development and evaluation of programmes. This design, development and evaluation takes account of awarding body requirements, legislative, policy, social and economic contexts, stakeholder needs and technological change. Lecturers plan and prepare the learning experience taking account of learners' prior knowledge and skills, current and developing methods of learning, teaching and assessment, and available resources.

Standards

The lecturer should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of principles of curriculum design and planning and theories of learning, teaching and assessment.
2. Plan for effective learning in the vocational or subject area taking account of the needs of all learners and appropriate principles and theories.
3. Evaluate and select appropriate resources.
4. Design and produce appropriate learning, teaching and assessment materials.
5. Design and justify a strategy to evaluate a learning experience.

Indicative Content

  • Curriculum models.
  • Change and developments in the curriculum.
  • Subject knowledge, understanding and skills and how these are interpreted for learning.
  • Current and emerging theories of learning, teaching and assessment.
  • Aims and objectives of learning; learning goals.
  • Modes of delivery
  • Coherent and progressive learning programmes.
  • Lesson and assessment plans.
  • Criteria for selection of learning and teaching activities, e.g. variety, challenge, motivation, range, organisation.
  • Inclusive practice to meet learners' diverse needs, e.g. factors of age, gender, disability, and ethnicity.
  • Strategies to promote positive attitudes to social and cultural diversity.
  • Strategies to promote core skills, skills for citizenship and skills for employability.
  • Strategies to promote literacies.
  • Strategies to promote independent learning: responsibility, ways and styles of learning, attitudes and behaviour.
  • Health and safety considerations.
  • Appropriate use of ICT to support learning.
  • Criteria for evaluation and selection of types of resources.
  • Copyright legislation.
  • Evaluation planning: focus, qualitative and quantitative data, methods of collection of data, criteria for success.

Initial Professional Standards for Teaching/Facilitating Learning

Context and Rationale

Lecturers work both independently and co-operatively within a diverse range of learning, teaching and assessment environments. They work with learners from a wide range of social, economic and educational backgrounds. Lecturers use a variety of approaches to empower, motivate and support learners to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes for learning, personal development and employment. They are required to evaluate and reflect on the impact of their practice on learning.

Standards

The lecturer should be able to:

1. Create and maintain an interactive, supportive, and safe learning environment that is conducive to learning.
2. Communicate effectively and develop appropriate relationships that promote learning, positive behaviour and an ethos of mutual respect amongst learners.
3. Implement effectively a broad range of strategies to promote learning and independent learning at various levels and/or using different modes of delivery.
4. Identify and take appropriate actions to address the collective and individual needs of learners.
5. Promote positive attitudes to human diversity through accessible learning and teaching resources.
6. Use learning, teaching and assessment resources effectively to meet diverse learning needs.
7. Implement a strategy to evaluate the quality of own teaching and the learning experience and reflect on the implications for future practice.

Indicative Content

  • Relevant legislation, standards and guidelines as they apply to children, young people and adults: health and safety, protection and welfare, anti-discrimination and equality.
  • The lecturer as a positive role model for learners.
  • Methods for promoting positive behaviour and dealing with inappropriate behaviour.
  • College and/or partner schools' codes of conduct.
  • The impact of lecturers' and learners' individual behaviours and attitudes.
  • Group dynamics.
  • Strategies to promote positive attitudes to social and cultural diversity.
  • Management and delivery of learning and teaching activities.
  • Barriers to learning and how to overcome them.
  • Challenge and motivation of learners; high but realistic expectations.
  • Interpersonal skills, professionalism, ethics.
  • Strategies to develop the learning skills of learners.
  • Information literacy skills required by learners.
  • Techniques for identifying core skills.
  • Information about learners' previous experiences.
  • Social, cultural and emotional factors and their effect on learning.
  • Differentiation strategies.
  • Ways of seeking, responding to and giving feedback for learning.
  • Effective and appropriate communication with learners, colleagues, other professionals and external agencies.
  • Use of ICT to address different learner needs.
  • Appropriate application of assistive technologies.
  • The reflective practitioner.

Initial Professional Standards for Assessment

Context and Rationale

Lecturers undertake assessment to promote learning, to affirm learners' achievement as an integral and essential aspect of the learning and teaching process and to provide evidence for certification. They use formative and summative assessment strategies, design and select assessment instruments, mark and give feedback on learners' work. Lecturers also undertake administrative duties to meet external and internal requirements. Assessment takes place in a range of environments including classrooms, workshops, flexible learning centres, online and in the workplace.

Standards

The lecturer should be able to:

1. Devise suitable assessment strategies based on a critical understanding of the principles, purposes, means and terminology of assessment.
2. Design, produce, use and review assessment instruments taking account of learners' needs and the class, group, subject or unit being taught.
3. Evaluate, and justify appropriate selections from, a broad range of assessment instruments taking account of learners' needs and the class, group, subject or unit being taught.
4. Measure and record progress and attainment.
5. Use assessment feedback to promote learning, affirm achievement, and inform future learning goals.
6. Use assessment results as evidence to inform the evaluation of learning and teaching.
7. Implement external and internal policies and procedures for assessment and moderation/verification.

Indicative Content

  • Assessment for learning; assessment for certification.
  • Principles of validity, reliability, practicability, and fairness in assessment.
  • Formative and summative; peer and self; formal and informal; continuous and terminal; internal and external assessment.
  • Assessment methods: written, oral, online, product assessment; assessment by observation, witness testimony.
  • Norm-referenced, grade-related criteria, criterion-referenced, self-referenced, and diagnostic assessment.
  • Legal considerations, e.g. health and safety, disability, discrimination, equality, copyright and data protection.
  • Awarding body standards.
  • Policies and procedures of awarding bodies, colleges and other relevant agencies, e.g. schools, in relation to assessment, re-assessment, appeals, special assessment arrangements and plagiarism.
  • Timing of, and conditions for, assessment
  • Criteria for evaluation and selection of assessment instruments, e.g. variety, good practice.
  • Adaptation of assessment instruments to meet learners' diverse needs, e.g. sensory impairment, dyslexia.
  • Literacy and language issues.
  • Appropriate use of ICT in assessment.
  • Transparency and use of criteria, marking, marking schemes and sample solutions to measure learning.
  • Oral and written feedback to learners.
  • Reporting to other agencies, e.g. employers, schools.
  • Record keeping: checklists and schedules, attainment records, use of ICT.
  • Moderation/verification: awarding body requirements, sampling criteria, documentation.

Initial Professional Standards for Quality and Standards

Context and Rationale

In a culture that values quality and standards, colleges are committed to assuring, improving and enhancing all of the services that impact on the learner experience. They apply internal and external standards for the services they provide within the constraints of resources. Arrangements include self-evaluations, audits, reviews, staff development and career reviews, validations, approvals and moderation and verification. Learners and other stakeholders participate in many aspects of these arrangements, which operate at corporate, team and individual levels. Lecturers have a responsibility to uphold the college's standards of service and have a key role in maintaining and improving the quality of learning, teaching and assessment.

Standards

The lecturer should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the principles, purposes and processes of quality assurance, improvement and enhancement.
2. Implement effectively college arrangements for quality assurance, improvement and enhancement as an individual and as a member of a team.
3. Contribute effectively to the quality roles and functions of curriculum teams.
4. Critically evaluate own practice in teaching/facilitating learning and assessing using a range of approaches.
5. Use an appropriate range of evidence to identify strengths and areas for enhancement; weaknesses and areas for improvement at team and individual levels.
6. Agree targets, formulate individual action plans and contribute to team plans to address identified areas for enhancement and improvement.

Indicative Content

  • Definitions of quality.
  • College quality standards, systems and frameworks.
  • Academic quality standards, systems and frameworks e.g.SFC/ HMIe, awarding bodies and SQMS.
  • Organisational quality standards e.g. Chartermark, IIP and ISOs.
  • Quality standards relating to partnership agreements, e.g. with colleges, partner schools, higher education institutions and businesses.
  • Quality roles and remits.
  • Processes, procedures and proformas.
  • Evaluative modes of thinking and writing.
  • Self-evaluation, audit, review and benchmarking.
  • Identification and sharing of best practice.
  • Sources of evidence.
  • Quantitative and qualitative data.
  • Data collection methods, e.g. questionnaires, observations, surveys, discussion groups and interviews.
  • Analysis of performance indicators ( PIs), e.g. under-represented groups, attainment, achievement, retention and progression.
  • Feedback from learners and other key stakeholders, e.g. partner schools, employers and community organisations.
  • Target setting, action planning, and monitoring and reviewing progress.

Initial Professional Standards for Professional Practice and Development

Context and Rationale

Lecturers must be flexible, reflective, innovative and committed to their continuing vocational and professional development. The colleges in which they operate are complex organisations that must anticipate and respond rapidly to legislative, political, economic, social and technological change. Lecturers must understand this context for change and college processes for planning to meet it. They should be agents for change in developing best professional practice for the benefit of learners, partner organisations and the wider educational environment.

Standards

The lecturer should be able to:

1. Demonstrate a critical understanding of how Further Education is influenced by, and contributes toward, policy and the wider social, economic and cultural environment.
2. Critically reflect on own values and deal with issues in accordance with the values and ethics that underpin professional practice.
3. Work with a comprehensive understanding of the roles, rights and responsibilities of the college lecturer.
4. Comply with legislation and adopt good practice in relation to equality, social and cultural diversity and the protection and welfare of children, young people and vulnerable learners.
5. Manage self, relationships and work demands to promote personal, emotional and physical well-being.
6. Engage in reflective practice.
7. Review professional development needs and negotiate professional development activities to achieve individual, team and organisational goals.

Indicative Content

  • Current government policies/initiatives, strategies and goals.
  • The funding environment in which Scotland's Colleges operate.
  • Collaboration: schools, colleges and universities.
  • Relevant legislation and good practice: equality and social and cultural diversity; the protection and welfare of children, young people and vulnerable learners; freedom of information, data protection, copyright.
  • Promotion of: environmental awareness, sustainable development; citizenship; healthy lifestyles.
  • Job descriptions and terms and conditions of service.
  • The college's ICT policy and e-systems.
  • Current and emerging learning and assistive technologies.
  • College processes for: strategic and operational planning including the contribution made by lecturers, staff development and career review.
  • Strategies to promote health, safety and wellbeing of both self and colleagues, including methods for the prevention/reduction of stress.
  • Strategies to promote good relationships with colleagues: interpersonal and communication skills, equality and inclusiveness and conflict resolution.
  • Engagement with recent and relevant research, educational theory and practice.
  • Evidence based approaches to developing teaching and learning.
  • Requirements and opportunities for continuing professional development.
  • Current practices in industry/commerce/business processes.
  • Networks for sharing good practice including online discussion.