What to do after a death in Scotland: ... practical advice for times of bereavement - 8th Edition

DescriptionInformation about what to do after someone dies in Scotland, and about succession and inheritance law.
ISBN0-7559-4943-9
Official Print Publication DateApril 2006
Website Publication DateApril 27, 2006

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Contents

PART I. FROM THE TIME OF DEATH TO THE FUNERAL
1. First things to be done
2. Donation of body parts for transplantation
3. Getting a medical certificate
4. The Procurator Fiscal
5. How to register a death
6. Planning the funeral
7. Cremation or burial
8. Help with the funeral
9. Paying for the funeral

PART II. POSSESSIONS, PROPERTY AND CHILDREN
10. Is there a will?
11. The executors
12. Small estates
13. Distribution of property and possessions
14. The home
15. Debts

PART III. SOCIAL SECURITY HELP
16. Help from social security

PART IV. WHAT ELSE HAS TO BE DONE?
17. Other things to do

PART V. RIGHTS OF SUCCESSION
18. Where the person did not leave a will
19. Prior rights
20. Legal rights
21. The remainder of the estate
22. The three principles
23. Where the person left a will
24. Adopted children
25. Cohabitants
26. If you are making a will or need more guidance

PART VI. USEFUL ADDRESSES

Most people at some point in their lives find themselves responsible for making the arrangements after the death of a relative or friend. It is a difficult and worrying time, and this booklet tells you some of the things that have to be done. It applies to Scotland only. Leaflet D49S "What to do after a death in Scotland: social security supplement" gives extra information on help you can get from social security. You can get it from a registrar, Jobcentre Plus or social security office. There is a similar leaflet, D49, that applies to England and Wales and is available from offices there.

Further Advice

The death of someone close to you can be overwhelming, and you may need practical advice to help you manage. You may also need to speak to someone about how you feel.

You can get practical advice from a funeral director, your family doctor, a solicitor, your local social work department or Citizens Advice Bureau. You will find numbers for these organisations in your local telephone directory. Part VI of this booklet gives contact details for a number of organisations that may be able to help you.

If a health visitor or district nurse attended the person who died, he or she may be able to help. If the person died in hospital, speak to the Charge Nurse who may refer you to the hospital chaplain or social worker.

There are several organisations that can offer you counselling or emotional support. You may wish to contact your minister of religion. Your local telephone directory may also have details of other organisations that offer such services in your area.

You could also contact your local Citizens Advice Bureau or Age Concern group. If you cannot find a local service, you will find the details of the national offices of these organisations at Part VI of this booklet.

About this booklet

The Scottish Executive Justice Department publish this booklet. You can get additional copies from them (details below), from your local Citizens Advice Bureau, or from Blackwell's Bookshop.

Blackwell's Bookshop
53 South Bridge
Edinburgh
EH1 1YS
Telephone orders and enquiries 0131 622 8283 or 0131 622 8258
Fax orders 0131 557 8149
Email orders business.edinburgh@blackwell.co.uk

Scottish Executive Justice Department
Civil Law Division
Room 2W(R), St. Andrew's House
Regent Road
EDINBURGH
EH1 3DG
Telephone: 0131 244 2193

You can also view the most up to date version of this booklet online at http://www.scotland.gov.uk/familylaw/