Evaluation of the Scottish Adult Literacy and Numeracy (ALN) Strategy - Final Report

DescriptionThe report evaluates the Scottish Adult Literacy and Numeracy (ALN) Strategy through a survey of a sample of literacy and numeracy learners and ALN tutors within 9 geographical areas in Scotland.
ISBN0 7559 2987
Official Print Publication Date
Website Publication DateMarch 20, 2006

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Lyn Tett*, Stuart Hall**, Kathy Maclachlan**, Graham Thorpe**, Vivien Edwards* and Linda Garside**
*University of Edinburgh
**University of Glasgow


Scottish Executive Social Research 2006
ISBN 0 7559 2987 X (Web only publication)

This document is also available in pdf format (736k)

CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
CHAPTER ONE THE RESEARCH
Context, Aims and Objectives

CHAPTER TWO: METHODOLOGY: THE LEARNER SAMPLE
First Survey of the Learners
Second Survey of the Learners
Case Studies of Learners
Data Analysis

CHAPTER THREE: LEARNER CHARACTERISTICS
Learner Characteristics: Comparison with the First Interview Sample
Programme Characteristics: Comparison with the First Interview Sample
Changes Between the First and Second Interviews

CHAPTER FOUR: PATHWAYS INTO ALN
Motivation to Start the Programme
Barriers to Entry
Pathways into ALN

CHAPTER FIVE: LEARNING, TEACHING AND THE CURRIULUM

CHAPTER SIX: GUIDANCE
Entry
Guidance on the Course
Exit Guidance at the End of the Course

CHAPTER SEVEN: REFLECTION ON TEACHING AND LEARNING
CHAPTER EIGHT: SOCIAL CAPITAL
CHAPTER NINE: CONFIDENCE SCALES

CHAPTER TEN: ECONOMIC AND HOME LIVES
Changes in the Lives of the Learners
Individual Changes in Lives

CHAPTER ELEVEN: FINDINGS FROM THE TUTORS' SURVEY
The Sample
The Interview
Tutor Characteristics
Entry Pathways for Learners
Learning, Teaching and the Curriculum
Guidance and Support
Exit Pathways
Reflections on the Learning Programme
The National ALN Initiative
Resources
Staffing
Staff Development
Management
Monitoring and Evaluation
Procedures

CHAPTER TWELVE: CONCLUSION
What are the barriers and pathways into learning for ALN learners?
What are learners' and tutors' perceptions of the quality of learning and support?
What are the outcomes and impact that learning has on individual learners?
What are the possible implications for the wider social benefit and economic activity from such findings?

CHAPTER THIRTEEN: RECOMMENDATIONS ARISING FROM THE RESEARCH
REFERENCES

CHARTS

3.1 A comparison of the first and second samples by age
3.2 A comparison of the first and second samples by type of provider
3.3 A comparison of the first and second samples by learning location
3.4 A comparison of the first and second samples by type of programme
3.5 A comparison of the first and second samples by programme arrangement
3.6 A comparison of the first and second samples by work status
4.1 What would make it easier to join learning programmes?
7.1 Learning Environment - FE
7.2 Learning Environment - non- FE
7.3 Experience of Teaching and Learning - FE
7.4 Experience of Teaching and Learning - non- FE
7.5 Social Environment - FE/non- FE
8.1 Do learners go out regularly?
8.2 Do learners want to become more involved in local activities?
9.1 Average confidence level - lst round interviews
9.2 Average confidence level - 2 nd round interviews
10.1 Where the greatest difference occurred. - A comparison between FE and non- FE
10.2 Where the greatest difference occurred. - A comparison by gender
11.1 Age of tutors with different working arrangements
11.2 Highest qualification
11.3 Tutor involvement in providing advice and guidance on learners' plans and aims
11.4 What tutors are involved in
11.5 Do tutors focus on strengths or needs?
11.6 How tutors organise their teaching
11.7 What support and guidance do tutors provide?
11.8 What tutors provide at exit from a course
11.9 Services provided by others at exit
11.10 The impact of change for ALN learners
11.11 Tutors' perception of the adequacy of staffing
11.12 Who managers consulted with
11.13 Monitoring and evaluation practices

TABLES

3.1 A comparison of the first and second samples by Partnership
3.2 Positive changes
3.3 Negative changes
4.1 Barriers to entry
6.1 ILPs - comparison between FE and non- FE
6.2 Guidance on the course
6.3 Did someone talk to you about how much you had learnt?
6.4 Did someone help you to think about the skills, knowledge and understanding you had gained during the class?
6.5 Did someone review your ILP with you to help you see what you had achieved?
6.6 Did someone talk to you about how much you had learned?
6.7 Did someone help you to think about the skills, knowledge and understanding you had gained during the class?
6.8 Did someone review your ILP with you to help you see what you had achieved?
6.9 Did anyone help you to find other learning opportunities that you could move onto?
6.10 Further learning routes accessed by learners
6.11 Reasons for leaving the programme
8.1 Aspects of neighbourhood - comparison between 1st and 2nd round responses
8.2 Why learners don't want to become more involved in local activities
8.3 Learners' feelings of safety - comparison between 1st and 2nd round responses
8.4 Contact with others - comparison between 1st and 2nd round responses
10.1 Where the greatest difference has occurred
10.2 Where the greatest difference has occurred. A comparison by work status
10.3 A summary of predictions and experiences
11.1 Key strengths
11.2 Ways to improve provision
11.3 Where the national initiative has made the most difference
11.4 How tutors rated resources
11.5 What has the ALN strategy impacted on?
11.6 How effective has the ITALL training been?
11.7 Number of development days attended by tutors
11.8 Access to staff development
11.9 Staff development opportunities: availability, adequacy and active support
11.10 Did tutors feel supported by their managers?
11.11 Major routes of communication between learners and management
11.12 Details of the evaluation procedures and methods

BOXES

7.1 An Integrated Course
7.2 Assessment
7.3 English as a Second or Other Language ( ESOL)
7.4 A Deaf Student
7.5 A Prison Experience
9.1 Boosted Confidence
9.2 Using the phone
9.3 Taking Action
10.1 Changes in multiple aspects of one life

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We would like to acknowledge the help and support we have received in conducting this research from the following individuals who were members of our Advisory Committee:

Audrey Robertson (Scottish Executive)
Fiona Macdonald (Learning Connections)
Fiona Boucher ( SALP)
Tertia Waters ( ASC)
Richard Edwards (University of Stirling)
Sandra Thomson (Job Centre Plus)
Liz Campbell (Community Learning and Development Managers Scotland - Adult Literacies Group)
Ann-Marie Bathmaker (University of Sheffield)

We would also like to thank all the tutors and learners of the ALN Partnerships in which we conducted the research.

The views expressed in this report are those of the researcher and
do not necessarily represent those of the Department or Scottish Ministers.

This report is available on the Scottish Executive Social Research website only
www.scotland.gov.uk/socialresearch.