Continuing Professional Development for Educational Leaders

DescriptionGuidance forming part of National Framework for CPD
ISBN0-7559-0887-2
Official Print Publication Date
Website Publication DateSeptember 16, 2003

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    Continuing Professional Development for Educational Leaders
    Teaching in Scotland

    This document is also available in pdf format (310k)

    Documents produced in this series:-
    1. Continuing Professional Development
    2. Standard for Chartered Teacher
    3. Chartered Teacher Status: Frequently Asked Questions
    4. Professional Review and Development
    5. Professional Review and Development: Frequently Asked Questions

    When the best leader's work is done, the people say, "We did it ourselves."
    Lao-tsu

    Context

    A Teaching Profession for the 21st Century, the formal agreement between the Scottish Executive, education authorities and teachers, placed a new emphasis on the continuing professional development of all teachers.

    Professional Review and Development Guidelines issued in 2002, 1 highlighted the need for all teachers, in consultation with their managers, to identify, consider and address their development needs on an annual basis. The Professional Review and Development process encourages teachers to plan their continuing professional development with reference to the professional expectations placed upon them.

    Educational leadership creates a particular set of expectations and requires a number of specific skills and characteristics. In the ever-changing educational environment, the demands made upon leaders of learning communities are numerous and diverse.

    This framework aims to support the process of Professional Review and Development by outlining a progressive set of qualities and functions pertinent to different responsibilities in education. Teachers and their reviewers can use the framework as a map against which to identify where they are in their professional development, what their strengths might be, and in which areas they might require further support and development.

    This document is intended to assist the development of authority or school based frameworks, and should be considered just one element of a comprehensive framework designed to meet the needs of teachers with differing levels of experience and at various stages in their career. Clearly, local authorities will need to consider how they work with small schools to ensure that similar opportunities are available to those that may be available in larger schools.

    The framework is not a programme that every teacher who aspires to a promoted post must follow, nor does it mean that every teacher who follows the framework must do so through accredited courses. Many of the suggested activities can be pursued in the course of normal work.

    Finally, in drafting this document the contributors were very conscious of the debate around leadership versus management. The document establishes our definition of leadership and management for the purpose of this framework. We have avoided expanding on this definition, as that was not our purpose, instead we leave it to the reader to consider further the role of the leader and their relationship with management.

    Introduction

    All teachers, together with those working in education authorities, pre-school establishments, the inspectorate, further and higher education and other educational bodies, have valuable roles to play in leading the learning community. The demonstration of leadership in the classroom is a criterion for any successful teacher, and development opportunities to enhance classroom leadership should be pursued by all. This document, however, focuses more on the skills and abilities required to lead other adults in learning communities.

    Effective educational leadership is essential if we are to give every child the best possible start in life. Without effective leadership, learning communities cannot provide the most effective environment for developing either pupils or staff.

    Clearly, educational leadership responsibilities extend far beyond headteachers or those in senior leadership posts. In fulfilling those roles, educational leaders enable both colleagues and pupils to embrace new challenges and to maximise their potential.

    Effective leadership is recognised internationally as a crucial factor in successful learning. It is vital that leadership talent is nurtured and developed within Scottish education. In providing that support, it is important to recognise the diverse range of leadership roles, levels, responsibilities and aspirations involved.

    Many teachers will wish to develop or maintain their leadership skills without necessarily becoming headteachers or members of leadership teams. Headteachers with many years of experience will still require to refresh and enhance their practice and to seek new challenges to further their professional development. The development needs of those working in schools and in the broader education sector will be informed by their specific responsibilities and the contexts in which they work.

    All educational leaders, no matter what their stage, experience or ambitions have development needs, which should be identified and addressed through Professional Review and Development and should reflect the priorities of the teachers as well the school, local authority and national priorities. The framework in this guidance aims to highlight the competences characteristic of effective leadership and to outline a progressive set of leadership functions and qualities required at different levels and within different contexts. The guidance also provides examples of development opportunities that will support leaders and prepare them for their role in enabling every teacher and every pupil to reach their full potential.

    The framework is also intended to support the work of those procuring and commissioning CPD activities by providing a common basis for planning and evaluating leadership development provision.

    Case Studies

    Some case studies are outlined to illustrate how programmes of CPD for individuals might be designed and agreed. In each case study the programme is balanced to ensure the three elements of professional values and commitments, knowledge and understanding and professional and personal abilities underpinning practice are developed as well as enabling the teacher to learn in action.

    Case Study

    Jane is a depute headteacher in a large primary school who aspires to become a headteacher. She is already enrolled on the Scottish Qualification for Headship programme. At her annual review it is agreed that she will lead on the school development priority to improve progression with a specific focus on the provision of formative feedback to pupils and improving the tracking of achievement. This will enable her to address both leading learning and teaching and leading people (SQH Programme). To support this work she will visit one of the local cluster primaries, which has already worked on this area with a degree of success, and report to the senior management team. In addition, she will attend a development activity on recruitment and selection prior to managing the appointment of a new classroom assistant.

    The relationship between leadership and management

    In the last century much of the emphasis on promoted posts in schools, and in other organisations across different sectors, has been on the management skills required to do the job. Today the debate has turned to the role of the leader and their relationship to management.

    A leader secures the support, commitment and enthusiasm of staff and so enables the smooth and effective running of often-complex systems of management. Leadership is about defining what the future should look like, agreeing a shared vision and inspiring others to make it happen, even in the face of adversity.

    Clearly, effective management is vital for the successful progress of any educational establishment. Management, however, might more appropriately be viewed as the practical application of leadership skills. Effective leadership provides positive direction and purpose. Effective management ensures that purpose can be achieved. Management involves a variety of activities, including:

    • Communicating and consulting
    • Selecting and managing staff
    • Establishing structures and policies
    • Delegating
    • Monitoring
    • Evaluating
    • Problem-solving
    • Planning
    • Budgeting.

    In the next section we define a model for educational leadership, and describe some of the key markers that can define a good leader.

    A Model for Educational Leadership

    The framework in this guidance is based on the model for professional action that underpins the design of the Standard for Chartered Teacher and the Standard for Headship in Scotland. The model consists of three elements that permeate and support effective professional action in educational leadership at all levels:

    • Professional Values and Commitments
    • Professional Knowledge and Understanding
    • Professional and Personal Abilities

    The professional actions of educational leaders are driven by their professional values and commitments, underpinned by their knowledge and understanding and given expression through their professional and personal abilities. These elements determine whether or not leaders' actions are likely to be effective in promoting the learning achievements of pupils.

    Case Study

    Annette is a newly appointed principal teacher. She has had experience of project management and feels she has developed a number of skills as a result. The area that most concerns her is that of monitoring and evaluation, particularly the issue of developing a sound classroom focus and improving self-evaluation within the department. She also feels she needs to develop her knowledge and understanding of managing people. It is agreed that Annette will shadow an experienced principal teacher and discuss the issues of self-evaluation at departmental level as a basis for thinking about how to review practice in her department. She will also attend a development activity on monitoring classroom practice and shadow a pupil in S1 and S2 and discuss what she observes with her senior leadership team link to develop her observational skills. She will undertake a review of current policy and practice within the department and identify staff development needs. The department will then pilot and evaluate a new approach and agree a system for the future. The school will support Annette in undertaking a web-based course in team management.

    THE PROFESSIONAL ACTIONS

    Professional Knowledge and Understanding

    Professional Knowledge and Understanding. Good and effective educational leaders have a knowledge and understanding of the following areas and, where appropriate to their level, of the processes and practices involved in leading those areas:

    • Principles and practice of leadership
    • Staff welfare
    • Pupil welfare and personal and social development issues
    • Curriculum development
    • Quality assurance systems
    • Learning and teaching
    • Approaches to raising standards of pupil achievement
    • Local and national context for policy development
    • Methods of assessment and reporting
    • Approaches to change management
    • Principles and practice of social justice,education inclusion and equality
    • Strategies for staff recruitment, deployment, development and review
    • Planning, policy development and implementation
    • Resource and budget
    • Relevant legislation

    Professional Values and Commitments

    Professional Values and Commitments are at the core of educational leadership. Good and effective educational leaders demonstrate their values and commitments by:

    • Keeping the pupil at the heart of education
    • Focusing on learning
    • Developing, maintaining and acting upon educational principles
    • Developing, maintaining and communicating an ethical perspective
    • Developing, maintaining and communicating a vision and purpose
    • Exemplifying consistent educational values
    • Being open critically to ideas, new and old
    • Regularly reviewing personal practice, setting personal targets and taking responsibility for personal development
    • Supporting self-evaluation in others
    • Consistently supporting improvements in practice
    • Developing alliances and working in partnership with pupils, parents/carers, colleagues and other professionals in the wider community
    • Being committed to continuing professional development

    Professional and Personal Abilities

    Professional and Personal Abilities. Good and effective educational leaders:

    • Share leadership, value teams and work collaboratively
    • Create and maintain a positive atmosphere
    • Earn trust and trust others
    • Inspire and motivate others
    • Communicate effectively
    • Listen
    • Empathise with others
    • Identify problems and offer creative solutions
    • Show political insight
    • Judge wisely
    • Think strategically and seek and use all relevant information
    • Demonstrate confidence and courage.

    The professional actions carried out by good and effective educational leaders at every level are outlined in the framework on pages 12-25.

    A Framework for Educational Leadership

    This framework is based on the notion of professional progression in educational leadership through four broad levels. The framework is intended to provide a means of promoting professional development and is not intended to provide a structure for managing schools:

    Project Leadership For teachers who have, or may take on, responsibility for leading a small-scale project. This refers to teachers possibly quite early in their careers, who wish to develop their leadership skills, for instance in an area related to curriculum development or supporting pupils' learning, or through a small school-based research project.

    Team Leadership For teachers who, in addition to leading small-scale projects, have regular responsibility for leading either permanent teams of staff or task groups/working parties. This might be particularly relevant to aspiring and established principal teachers, whether their responsibilities are primarily in the areas of the curriculum or of guidance.

    School Leadership For staff who lead projects and teams, and who have, or are seeking, overall responsibility for an aspect of leadership across an establishment. This might include teachers or principal teachers who aspire to membership of a senior leadership team and to established members of such teams. Some members of senior leadership teams will aspire to headship, and the achievement of the Standard for Headship might be sought within this level.

    Strategic Leadership For staff who, in addition to project, team and school leadership responsibilities, have overall responsibility for the leadership of an establishment or are leading strategic initiatives at local or national level. This would be particularly relevant to headteachers, and to those working in the education service who have a strategic role in improving Scottish education.

    The framework identifies the personal and professional commitments and abilities required at each of these leadership levels, and provides examples of the sort of professional actions through which such commitments and abilities can be expressed. The professional actions are outlined within four key areas:

    • Learning and Teaching
    • People
    • Policy and Planning
    • Resources

    Together, the professional actions provide a clear basis for progression in all the relevant aspects of educational leadership. At each level, teachers should be able to carry out the required professional actions successfully and to locate their practice within the context of the professional values and commitments, knowledge and understanding, and professional and personal abilities identified in the model for educational leadership on page 6.

    The framework also gives examples of the kind of CPD opportunities that might support the development, progression or regeneration of leadership skills. The list of examples provided is not intended to be exhaustive or prescriptive. Teachers may select experiences suggested within different levels if it is felt such experiences best meet their particular needs.

    The four levels outlined do not sit neatly within entirely separate and disconnected boxes. There is no distinct boundary between the sections of the framework and there may frequently be instances of overlap across different levels. Indeed, a teacher should not feel restricted in revisiting developmental needs that may need to be refreshed or further developed.

    Using the Framework

    Teachers should review their leadership skills against the commitments, abilities and actions described at the appropriate level in the framework. Development needs identified and agreed through the Professional Review and Development process should be used to inform the selection of suitable learning opportunities.

    The types of CPD opportunity that might be undertaken can range from work-based learning with critical self-evaluation, to mentoring or being mentored, shadowing, networking, short courses or longer programmes of study. For an illustrative list of experiences that contribute to teacher development see page 7 of the Professional Review and Development booklet. CPD plans should include a wide variety of experiences, including those focusing on the interpersonal attributes, such as emotional intelligence, required of effective leaders.

    Project Leadership

    It may well be that a teacher at this level needs to undertake a series of projects.
    A teacher might discover as a result of her or his first experience of project leadership that she/he needs to develop negotiation skills, time management skills or a better understanding of the vision and values of the learning community. Another teacher who wants to progress to team leader level may wish to undertake a number of different projects to extend her or his capabilities in preparation for greater responsibility.

    Team Leadership

    Team leaders need opportunities to develop all aspects of their role and this may well entail agreeing a programme that runs over several sessions to allow them to focus on different aspects of their practice. Team leaders need to develop their knowledge and understanding of learning and teaching, people, policy, and planning and resources, and to develop their effectiveness in relation to each of these key areas. They also need to develop a holistic overview of the team's work and to understand how all aspects combine together to enhance the performance of a team. Even experienced team leaders will need to review their performance in key areas. As the team leader role develops and changes over time, postholders will require to update their knowledge and understanding and develop new capabilities.

    School Leadership

    Teachers at this level will need opportunities to take responsibility for a variety of whole-school functions, through leading substantial development projects. They should undertake work that furthers the learning community's development priorities and effectively builds the capacity of the establishment to respond positively to the need for continuous development and change. For those who have been in post for some time there may be a need to review areas of practice and explore opportunities to extend knowledge and understanding in the light of changing functions and definitions of professionalism.

    Strategic Leadership

    Strategic leadership implies a wider contribution to the education service.
    Where appropriate, this responsibility must be carefully balanced with the central responsibility to continue to develop the individual's own establishment as an increasingly effective learning community. At this stage, development needs will be focused on a more holistic approach to leadership issues particularly at strategic level and on opportunities to update and augment knowledge and understanding and to develop new skills as appropriate.

    Case Study

    Carol is a mathematics teacher. She has embarked on a programme designed to meet the Standard for Chartered Teacher and is not yet sure whether she wishes to continue on this career path, or to pursue a career in educational leadership. To assist her in this decision, she wants to acquire some of the leadership skills required of principal teachers. At her annual review, it is agreed that she will attend a short local authority course on effective project leadership. Carol has had the experience of being a member of some working groups within her school but has never led one. It is agreed that an opportunity will be sought to allow this to take place. During this activity, Carol will be mentored by a member of the senior leadership team and will produce an evaluative account of events.

    A FRAMEWORK FOR EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP

    The Commitments and abilities of effective leaders:

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Works with colleagues to develop a clear purpose for a project based on a commitment to educational and professional values
    • Critically self-evaluates
    • Works collaboratively to maintain motivation, ensure good communication, address problems and find effective solutions
    • Creates and maintains a positive atmosphere within the group
    • Creates and maintains constructive relations with other colleagues affected by the project

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Inspires and motivates the team
    • Ensures that educational values and purposes are discussed and understood
    • Demonstrates a commitment to critical self-evaluation and encourages and supports it in the team
    • Works to discover and enhance the professional capabilities of team members
    • Shows good judgement and the capacity to think strategically in identifying priorities, setting targets and using resources imaginatively
    • Shows confidence and courage in ensuring good practice is maintained

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Develops and communicates strategic direction that inspires and motivates the whole school
    • Exemplifies the values and aims of the school
    • Shows a strong commitment to learning and self improvement and encourages the same in others
    • Creates a productive, vibrant and supportive ethos based on high expectations
    • Makes sound and informed judgements based on an empathetic, curious and reflective engagement with the whole school community
    • Shows a sound understanding of political issues and the ability to handle these effectively

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Communicates a compelling vision that excites and motivates others
    • Demonstrates far-sightedness with an effective personal style based upon a critical self-awareness
    • Uses a variety of strategies to maintain and enhance the performance of others
    • Engages with and contributes to the development of policy
    • Has the courage, confidence and commitment to challenge current orthodoxies based on a sound and considered understanding of educational issues
    • Regards problems as opportunities and thinks creatively about the future of education

    The professional actions of effective leaders

    LEARNING AND TEACHING

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Ensures impact of project on learning and teaching is positive

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Communicates a clear view of team's role in enhancing pupil achievement
    • Establishes, promotes and inspires innovative approaches to improving management of learning and teaching
    • Establishes processes to create, maintain and enhance conditions for maximising pupils' achievements

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Focuses on learning and keeps pupil at heart of school's work
    • Creates purposeful, vibrant, supportive and inclusive ethos based on high expectations
    • Establishes and develops processes at school level to create, maintain and enhance conditions for effective learning and teaching
    • Is fully committed to development of each individual pupil

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Establishes school as learning organisation within the wider community
    • Is fully committed to development of each individual pupil
    • Promotes inter-disciplinary and multi-professional approaches to improving educational outcomes
    • Looks to national and international exemplars
    • Seeks creative and innovative approaches to teaching and learning

    Case Study

    Alan is a secondary headteacher with ten years' experience. He recognises the need to develop his leadership skills within new contexts and has taken advantage of opportunities as they have arisen in the past. For example, following training, he has been the field assessor for a number of SQH candidates. He has also mentored a less experienced colleague.

    At his annual review, it is agreed that he will carry out an investigation, on behalf of the education authority, into future school management structures. He will meet regularly with a member of the directorate to discuss progress and will present a paper to the Director of Education.

    Case Study

    Jenny is a newly appointed primary principal teacher. She had been at the forefront of a number of initiatives within the school before being appointed but felt that she would like to develop her leadership skills further by managing the development of a school development plan priority. It was agreed she would lead a team of staff, parents, children and other community members, to establish an anti-bullying/anti-racist policy for the school. The DHT was established as her mentor for this project, to provide support and guidance throughout. Before bringing the team together she would liaise with the anti-bullying network and gather sample policies and authority documents. By gathering information from staff, children and parents, she would be able to establish the current situation before leading the team through the development of the policy. Once the policy was established she would put into place strategies to implement the policy and evaluate its impact.

    The professional actions of effective leaders

    PEOPLE

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Creates, maintains and enhances effective working relationships within team and with relevant others
    • Supports development of individuals involved in project so they can complete project effectively

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Contributes to recruitment and selection of teaching and support staff at team level
    • Develops and supports team and individuals within it to enhance their performance and that of learning community
    • Plans, delegates and evaluates work carried out by team and individuals within it
    • Creates, maintains and enhances effective working relationships within team and between team and colleagues

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Recruits and selects teaching and support staff
    • Establishes and maintains systems to develop teams and individuals to enhance their performance and that of school
    • Ensures effective systems are in place to plan, delegate and evaluate work carried out by teams and individuals
    • Creates, maintains and enhances effective working relationships at school level
    • Ensures implementation of agreed personnel policies
    • Is committed to continuing professional development of self and colleagues

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Encourages and facilitates development of peers and those aspiring to educational leadership at school level
    • Champions innovation and encourages creativity in pursuit of improvement
    • Challenges poor performance
    • Describes compelling case for improvement and implements strategies to achieve this

    The professional actions of effective leaders

    POLICY AND PLANNING

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Ensures project is well planned
    • Ensures project is implemented in line with school values, aims, policies and plans
    • Expresses and communicates school values, aims, policies and plans through plans and work of team
    • Develops and maintains partnerships with pupils, parents and outside agencies as appropriate to team's agreed remit

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Works collaboratively to establish departmental policies and plans in context of school's aims, values and plans
    • Expresses and communicates school values, aims, policies and plans through plans and work of team
    • Develops and maintains partnerships with pupils, parents and outside agencies as appropriate to team's agreed remit

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Contributes to establishment of strategic direction of school
    • Develops and communicates school values, aims, policies and plans
    • Develop and maintain partnerships with pupils, parents, outside agencies and community

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Provides vision for school and plans strategically to achieve this
    • Shows sound understanding of policy context for education and ability to contribute to development of policy within educational community
    • Maintains and sustains commitment to strategic goals

    Case Study

    Morag is a music teacher in a large comprehensive secondary school. She wishes to pursue a career in educational leadership and is looking to begin to develop some of the skills required of principal teachers. Morag feels she needs to develop her skills in managing people and wishes to take a bigger part in the life of the school. After discussions with her line manager as part of the Professional Review and Development process Morag has identified several activities to help her establish some of the skills required by a principal teacher.

    Within her department Morag takes on responsibility of S1, S2 curriculum with a particular focus on monitoring classroom practice. To help her with this she shadows an S2 class, discussing what she observes with her PT, and produces a short written report. The whole department undertakes a monitoring and evaluation exercise focusing on QI 3.2, 'The teaching process' and Morag agrees to take responsibility for collating and sharing results. In addition to this work-based CPD opportunity, Morag takes responsibility for managing the budget for pupil purchase of instruments. This introduces her to managing budgets and finances.

    Morag agrees to establish and chair a 'social committee'. As chairperson of this group she takes on the responsibility of organising and chairing regular meetings, setting agendas, delegating tasks, communicating with the whole staff and planning and co-ordinating whole staff social events. These activities are discussed regularly with the PT with a particular focus on her understanding of managing people.

    Finally, through the Professional Review and Development process it is also agreed that Morag will attend a number of local authority short courses such as 'Managing Teaching and Learning', 'Managing People' and 'Quality Assurance' focusing on the management skills required for a PT to complement her work-based CPD activities.

    The professional actions of effective leaders

    RESOURCES

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Identifies necessary resources
    • Manages resources assigned to project to maximise benefits to teaching and learning
    • Manages own and others' time effectively to ensure project is delivered to timescale

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Manages available resources and allocates them at team and individual level to support effective learning and teaching
    • Monitors and controls use of resources and facilities at team level efficiently and with due regard to health and safety

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Manages available school resources and allocates them to support effective learning and teaching
    • Monitors and controls the use of school resources and facilities efficiently with due regard to health and safety

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Works to secure improvement of accommodation and school design
    • Works to develop effective systems for allocating and monitoring resources
    • Works to build alliances locally, nationally and internationally
    • Ensures resources are best deployed to meet strategic plans

    Case Study

    Gary is a Quality Improvement Officer with responsibility for Early Years Education. He has a particular interest in working with parents and carers in areas of social deprivation. In his previous post, he worked with a colleague on the development of an innovative support programme for children and their families. He has learned of a similar successful programme which is running in another part of Scotland, and suggests to his manager that he visits this project to help identify key features. It is agreed that he will report back to the education department on his research, and
    will develop a plan to support the roll-out of a further four projects over the next year. During the development of the plan, he will consult regularly with the Nursery Headteachers' Group, and will be supported and guided by a senior colleague in
    the department.

    Suggested development opportunities for effective leaders:

    The following tables highlight some of the activities and experiences that might enhance or develop leadership competences within different educational contexts. The examples provided are not exhaustive and educational leaders will wish to consider their own needs, priorities and working environments when planning
    their professional development.

    EXAMPLES OF WORK-BASED DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Leading and managing small-scale project either within school or across cluster. Carrying out appropriate professional actions, reflecting upon experience of leading and completing project and evaluating what has been achieved
    • Securing support from more experienced leader acting as mentor or coach
    • Establishing action learning group with other teachers either within school, across cluster or more widely through use of ICT
    • Leading small-scale research project with support of member of senior leadership team
    • Undertaking structured programmes of reading, reflection, networking and shadowing

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Undertaking relevant projects systematically to cover all professional actions appropriate to level
    • Leading several teams working on large collaborative project
    • Securing support from more experienced leader acting as mentor or coach
    • Networking with other team leaders to support action learning. Using ICT to share experience and good practice across schools, locally or nationally
    • Researching and implementing theories and practice of emotional intelligence
    • Undertaking structured programmes of reading, reflection and evaluation, networking and shadowing

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Leading large, school-based projects with several teams, including some or all of senior leadership team, contributing to product
    • Reviewing and developing particular aspect of personal remit
    • Networking with other school leaders to support action learning. Using ICT to share experience and good practice across schools, locally or nationally
    • Developing programmes on aspects of leadership (e.g. emotional intelligence) for colleagues
    • Undertaking structured programmes of reading, reflection and evaluation, networking and shadowing

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Co-ordinating projects extending beyond bounds of learning community, whether at local, national or international level
    • Taking active part in development of other school leaders
    • Mentoring and co-mentoring to offer opportunities for support and reflection
    • Developing relationships between school and wider community, both locally and nationally
    • Implementing strategies to address development of aspects of leadership
      (e.g. emotional intelligence) in colleagues
    • Undertaking secondments, study visits, networking arrangements and shadowing, both within education sector and more widely

    EXAMPLES OF POSSIBLE PROJECTS

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Leading colleagues in P6 and 7 to develop programme of study and advise on curricular resources for functional writing in upper school

    Coaching
    Meeting with depute headteacher to discuss plans and progress

    Reporting
    Providing short evaluative report and presenting recommendations to whole staff during INSET day

    • Reviewing, organising and providing programme of work experience opportunities for pupils

    Coaching
    Meeting depute headteacher for mentoring support and to discuss/assess changes

    Reporting
    Providing depute headteacher with evaluation report of work experience programme

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Leading colleagues to review current practice of self-evaluation within department and revise departmental policy

    Coaching
    Visiting and shadowing two experienced PTs whose departments show good practice. Meeting with senior leadership team link to review progress

    Reporting
    Providing short evaluative report to senior leadership team link

    • Reviewing early learning strategies developed by infant team during previous five years and developing revised programme with appropriate staff development

    Coaching
    Meeting depute headteacher for mentoring support in creating team ownership and visiting other schools and pre-5 establishments with identified good practice

    Reporting
    Leading team presentation of draft proposals to depute headteacher and headteacher, and subsequent reporting to all staff at INSET day

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Developing integrated policy for staff development for school covering all staff and all relevant aspects of provision including: recruitment, induction, Professional Review and Development, work-based/other CPD, evaluation

    Coaching
    Meeting regularly with headteacher and senior leadership team to discuss progress

    Reporting
    Producing Standards and Quality report for this area of school's work

    • Reviewing school strategy for sustainable improvement and implementing revised focused programme to be incorporated into development plan

    Coaching
    Working with headteacher and support group of other senior leaders involved in similar projects

    Reporting
    Incorporating more focused attention on school improvement strategies into school development plan.

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Investigating, on behalf of education authority, development of future management structures and existing proposals

    Coaching
    Meeting regularly with appropriate member of education authority directorate to discuss progress

    Reporting
    Preparing major report to Education Committee on Future Management Capacity and Structures

    • Undertaking research/secondment by examining various characteristics of learning community and developing report for education authority

    Coaching
    Meeting well-established/successful headteacher and member of education authority staff for mentoring support

    Reporting
    Presenting report to education authority, for use in subsequent leadership programme "Creating a New Future"

    • Forming part of team of senior staff supporting education authority's leadership and/or mangement programme

    Coaching
    Meeting external consultant and education authority's CPD co-ordinator for mentoring support

    Reporting
    Discussing progress and seeking feedback from CPD co-ordinator

    EXAMPLES OF PROGRAMMES OF STUDY AND OTHER RELEVANT OPPORTUNITIES

    PROJECT LEADERSHIP

    A Project Leader:

    • Programme covering all functional elements of being project leader
    • Course concentrating on values and capabilities required to work collaboratively
    • Visits to other learning communities to explore good practice in relation to projects being undertaken
    • GTCS Teaching Scholar Programme
    • Course on emotional intelligence

    TEAM LEADERSHIP

    A Team Leader:

    • Programme examining principles of team building and reviewing and evaluating participants' current practice
    • Course providing grounding in principles of leadership and application in four key areas at team leader level
    • Seminar on leadership skills in enterprise, industry or other public sector body

    SCHOOL LEADERSHIP

    A School Leader:

    • Programme examining models for conflict resolution, providing opportunity to practice appropriate skills and giving feedback on performance
    • Development package involving both taught and work-based elements allowing participants to develop overview of role of senior leader
    • Secondment in enterprise, industry or other public sector body
    • Visits to organisations in other sectors to aid understanding of different approaches to leadership

    STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP

    A Strategic Leader:

    • Programme accommodating review of current practice in learning community, in order to revisit strategic goal
    • Courses focusing on education and the law
    • Mentoring/coaching links with senior leaders in enterprise, industry and public sectors
    • Networks dedicated to interests, concerns and development needs of headteachers

    Case Study

    Clare is a class teacher with four years' experience working in a medium sized primary school. She has a particular interest in ICT and has managed an exciting and challenging curriculum within her class. At her Professional Review and Development discussion she identified that she would be keen to share this experience with other teachers who had already expressed an interest in what she was doing.

    It was agreed that, with the support of the headteacher, Clare would work with three members of staff to pilot the use of the smart boards, which had recently arrived in school.

    As part of her research Clare would identify and visit a primary school where excellent practice had already been identified, spending the day observing how smart boards were being used to support learning and discussing with the headteacher how this initiative had been developed. She would also attend an exhibition where she would be able to view resources and generate ideas. She would identify resources, which teachers could use from the internet, and once the information was gathered she would plan with and support the group through the development. At the end of the pilot period she would prepare a session to share the group's experiences with the rest of the staff.