News

Listen

Reported Road Casualties Scotland 2010

25/10/2011

Reported road accident and casualty statistics were published today by Transport Scotland's Statistician.

This hard-copy reference document updates provisional figures published in June and presents more detailed analysis, including estimates of drink driving accidents, accident costs, comparisons with other countries and other data sources and an estimate of under-counting of road casualties.

Main Findings:

Road casualties
  • 208 deaths on Scotland's roads in 2010 - 4 per cent fewer than in 2009 (216), 36 per cent fewer than 2000 (326) and the lowest figure since records began
  • 1,964 reported seriously injured in 2010 - 14 per cent fewer than in 2009 (2,286), 45 per cent fewer than 2000 (3,568) and the lowest number since records began
  • 13,334 reported casualties in total in 2010 - 11 per cent fewer than in 2009 (15,043) and a 35 per cent reduction on 2000 (20,517)
  • 1,376 child casualties, 97 (7 per cent) fewer than in 2009 (1,473), 54 per cent fewer than 2000 (3,000)
  • Four child fatalities in 2010, 1 less than 2009
GB 2010 casualty reduction targets

Compared with the baseline averages for 1994-98, in 2009:

  • 55 per cent fewer people were killed or seriously injured, a larger reduction than the 2010 target of 40 per cent
  • 73 per cent fewer children were killed or seriously injured, a larger reduction than the 2010 target of 50 per cent
  • the slight casualty rate (per 100 million vehicle kms) was 45 per cent lower, a larger reduction than the 2010 target of 10 per cent
Road accidents
  • 10,293 reported injury accidents in 2010 - 11 per cent fewer than in 2009 and the lowest number since accident records began in 1966
  • 189 fatal accidents - 4 per cent fewer than in 2009 (note that a fatal accident may involve more than one fatality)
  • Since 2000, reported injury road accidents have fallen by 32 per cent whilst road traffic volume increased by 10 per cent
Types of road users
  • 8,296 car user casualties in 2010, 13 per cent fewer than 2009 and 34 per cent less than 2000
  • Including 105 fatalities (11 fewer than 2009) and 901 seriously injured (133 fewer than 2009)
  • 2,014 pedestrian casualties in 2010, 8 per cent fewer than 2009 and 44 per cent less than 2000
  • Including 47 fatalities (the same as 2009) and 455 seriously injured (54 fewer than 2009)
  • 845 motorcyclist casualties in 2010, 17 per cent fewer than 2009 and 25 per cent lower than 2000
    - Including 35 fatalities (eight fewer than 2009)
  • 781 pedal cyclist casualties in 2010, 3 per cent less than 2009 and 12 per cent fewer than 2000
    - Including seven fatalities (two more than 2009), 138 seriously injured (14 fewer than 2009) and 636 slightly injured (11 less than 2009)
  • Young car drivers (aged 17-25) were involved in 25 per cent of both reported car accidents and fatal car accidents
  • Young male car drivers (aged 17-25) were more likely to be involved in road accidents - in 2010 their accident rate was one and a half times the accident rate of car drivers of all ages (5.4 per thousand population verses 3.6 per thousand population)
Types of road
  • 72 per cent of all road deaths (149 out of 208) in 2010 occurred on non-built up areas (i.e. speed limit greater than 40 mph)
  • 49 per cent of people who were seriously injured (968 out of 1,964) were involved in accidents on built-up roads
  • Motorways have the lowest accident rates. Fatal accident rates tend to be highest for non built-up A roads, but overall accident rates (including slight injury accidents) tend to be highest for built-up B, C and unclassified roads
Comparison with England and Wales

Relative to England and Wales, Scotland's casualty rates (per population) were:

  • 34 per cent higher for fatalities, compared to the 1994/98 average of 19 per cent
  • the same level for seriously injured, compared to the 1994/98 average of 14 per cent higher
  • 28 per cent lower for all severities, compared to the 1994/98 average of 24 per cent lower
Comparison with countries in Western Europe and elsewhere
  • Road fatality rate: Scotland (40 per million population) had the eighth lowest rate of the 41 countries for which figures are available (2010)
  • Pedestrian fatality rate: Scotland (nine per million population) had the 13th lowest rate (of 35 countries); (2009 latest year available)
  • Child fatality rate: Scotland (five per million population aged under 15) had the second lowest rate (of 32 countries for which figures are available); 2009 is the latest year available
  • 65+ fatality rate: Scotland (48 per million population aged 65+) had the second lowest rate (of 32 countries); (2009 latest year available)
Drink-driving
  • 920 casualties (7 per cent of all reported casualties) were estimated to be due to drink-drive accidents in Scotland in 2009 (the latest year available), the same level as in GB as a whole
  • 30 fatalities (14 per cent of all reported fatalities) were estimated to be due to drink-drive accidents in Scotland in 2009, similar to the GB as a whole
  • Casualties resulting from drink drive accidents fell by 17 per cent since 1999 (from 1110 to 920)
  • In 2010, 3.6 per cent of drivers involved in injury accidents who were asked for a breath test registered a positive reading or refused to take the test
Accident costs
  • The estimated total cost of all road accidents (including damage only accidents) fell by 10 per cent, from £1,277 million in 2009 to £1,151 million (2009 prices)
Under-counting of road casualties
  • For the first time an estimate of the levels of under-counting of road casualties in Scotland is included in this publication
  • It has always been recognised that not all injury accidents are reported to the police and there is no legal requirement for parties to do so
  • This piece of analysis follows on from GB level analysis produced by DfT and provides an initial estimate of this under reporting of road accidents to the police. It also meets a requirement of the UK Statistics Authority
  • Estimates suggest no under counting of numbers killed on Scotland's roads and for serious and slight casualties, around half are contained in this dataset
  • There is no evidence to suggest the trend in road casualties is any different to that reported in this publication and this remains the most reliable and complete data source for monitoring injury accidents on Scotland's Roads

The analysis updates provisional figures published in Key Reported Road Casualty Statistics 2010 in June and are based on an extract of the database at August 23, 2011.

Figures cover injury accidents reported to the police only. Comparisons with hospital data and other accident sources are discussed in the publication along with initial estimates of levels of under counting where accidents are not reported to the police.

Progress towards 2010 GB casualty reduction targets is presented. These targets were set in 2000 and are measured against annual average casualty levels over 1994-1998.

The Scottish Road Safety Framework was launched in June 2009. It outlines Scottish specific targets to be adopted after the 2010 GB targets.